Thursday, August 21, 2008

Borat Meets David Letterman

Just wondering, guys, how you see the phenomenon of Borat.

I saw this clip of him being interviewed by Letterman in the States ...



... and I was curious to know whether his sense of humour translates in your countries. Or gets lost.

I howl - lots. But that's partly just me. I love the way he goes to the edge ... and then way way over!

So how is it for you?

14 comments:

  1. My 30 year old son insisted that I watch the Borat movie. I was not impressed. He thought it was hysterical. Generation gap, I suppose. wit from America

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  2. My 30 year old son insisted that I watch the Borat movie. I was not impressed. He thought it was hysterical. Generation gap, I suppose. wit from America

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  3. hey anon. people seem to fall into 'love' and 'hate' camps' - yep, i reckon part of it is a generational thing. can you say what is it about borat that you don't like? take care. nick

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  4. I just didn't find it that funny and gross at some points. I must be getting really old!

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  5. hey anon, i think it's also a british-australian and US divide - along with the sense of irony. interesting.

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  6. Nick. I bought the DVD and laughed once. Of course, he got the last laugh because I bought the DVD.

    Anyone thinking this was largely improvised is sadly mistaken.

    Alan down in Florida

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  7. I'm from Michigan and like British humor. However, I don't get Borat. To be fair, the "Jackass" movies do nothing for me either.

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  8. I am in my late 50s and I laughed so hard I could barely breathe. My partner is the same age, and he did the same. Absolutely one of the funniest movies I've ever seen. Loved the national anthem at the rodeo bit — that redneck ended up trying to sue Barak over that.

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  9. hey ?. i think it's the irish english (the non-french part of my heritage) to which borat appeals - that came through into the australian character as rebelliousness, non-politically correctness, wildness, and as rabelaisian humour. cultural gaps can be big. take care. nick

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  10. hey anon. we seem to be on exactly the same wave length - i loved the rodeo bit too - people in the stadium looked so confused - they'd never seen that angle on things before. i nearly choked in uncontrolled laughter. nick

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  11. hey alan

    i like your sense of humour bout being out borat-ed! in general i think he is a pretty culture bound phenomenon - for brit consumption only -

    don't know if i've sent this url before (it gets this way after a while!) but there is a lot of hot stuff here - well, from my point of view

    http://www.adrabboizbreakfast.com/

    is it the kind of stuff you like?

    have a great day

    best

    nick

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  12. I brit-consume a lot, comedy-wise and my take on Borat is that... the whole thing and guy and sketches badly sewn leave me cold.
    It's not that bad. It's not funny either. It follows in the good old tradition of being dumbed down for the masses. That is part of BritHumour I am not quite ready to embrace when there are so many alternatives. Jo, Jen, Adrian, David, Catherine, even Billy.
    So, overall? Makes me yawn, not LOL.

    But then I am so very weird and difficult to please. I want both brains and belly-laughter :)

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  13. hey peter. i'm happy to take something for the belly or the brain - tho being greedy, both is best. so sadly i think we differ seriously on this one. maybe the answer is one has the rabelais gene is not! anyway, how are you my friend? hopinn life is steaming ahead rapidly for you, as it is here. spring is creeping on us - yippy! daffodils are coming out! and so am i!!!

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